The Best Camping Tent Fan for Summer Camping – Reviews & Buying Guide

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When spring and summer roll around, millions of outdoor enthusiasts hit the roads and head out for a camping trip. Whether you enjoy sleeping out in the open beneath the stars or prefer tent life, heat and humidity can take a toll. There are a few ways to address that problem when camping during the warmer months, but a tent fan is often the easiest solution.

Camping Tent Fan Testing

Camping Tent Fan Testing

The best camping tent fan can keep you cool during extreme heat, although the design of the tent itself plays a part in that as well. While we aren’t going to cover hot weather tents this time around, we did round up some of the best-selling portable fans and decided to put them to the test. Our tent fan reviews and buying guide will help you find the perfect choice for your next outdoor adventure.

Size
4”
4”
10”
10”
Power
Rechargeable 2600mAh
Rechargeable  3350mAh
AC Adapter / D Batteries
AC Adapter / D Batteries
RunTime
3.5 – 6 hours
3.5 – 9 hours
Variable
Variable
Speeds
5
3
2
2
Weight
6.3 oz.
7.8 oz.
1.14 lbs.
2.4 lbs.
Warranty
1-year
1-year
None
None
Photo
Geek Aire GF2DB Mini Rechargeable Fan
Opolar F20 Portable Camping Fan
TREVA 10” All-Purpose Fan
Treva 10” Portable Desktop Fan
Size
4”
Power
Rechargeable 2600mAh
RunTime
3.5 – 6 hours
Speeds
5
Weight
6.3 oz.
Warranty
1-year
Photo
Geek Aire GF2DB Mini Rechargeable Fan
DigitalNerds Pick
Size
4”
Power
Rechargeable  3350mAh
RunTime
3.5 – 9 hours
Speeds
3
Weight
7.8 oz.
Warranty
1-year
Photo
Opolar F20 Portable Camping Fan
Size
10”
Power
AC Adapter / D Batteries
RunTime
Variable
Speeds
2
Weight
1.14 lbs.
Warranty
None
Photo
TREVA 10” All-Purpose Fan
Size
10”
Power
AC Adapter / D Batteries
RunTime
Variable
Speeds
2
Weight
2.4 lbs.
Warranty
None
Photo
Treva 10” Portable Desktop Fan

The Best Camping Tent Fans

Technically, any fan can work in a tent as long as you have room for it and a way to keep it powered. It’s something to keep in mind as tent fans are considered a niche product, so you won’t find many dedicated options that are true tent fans available on the market.

For these camping tent fan reviews, we chose two small and two medium-sized fans that can work in a variety of conditions, including picnic tables, motor homes, and tents of all shapes and sizes. The fans were tested for several weeks, and you might be surprised by how things panned out, given the popularity and ratings of several of these fans online.

Geek Aire GF2DB Mini Rechargeable Fan

Geek Aire GF2DB Mini Rechargeable Fan

Geek Aire GF2DB Mini Rechargeable Fan

The Geek Aire GF2DB doesn’t technically fall into the tent fan category as this USB powered fan is made for desktops or personal use. It’s ideal for the outdoors, however, because of its lightweight design, and while small, I was pleasantly surprised by its power.

With a weight of 6.3 ounces, this tent fan won’t take up much space in your pack. It’s not thick, so it’s easy to store, and the charging dock is relatively small as well. The dock doubles as a stand for the fan, which is handy, but only if you have something flat to sit it on while you’re trying to stay cool in your tent. It’s light enough to hang, but there’s no attachment point on this portable fan.

The Geek Aire GF2DB can be powered by any portable source with a USB connection, which includes portable power banks. That means you can actually detach the head of this fan from the base and plug it into a laptop or run it from a power bank. As the handle is also the power source, you can use the 2600mAh battery to recharge a smartphone, camping headlamps, and other gadgets on the fly as well.

Fans are not complicated gadgets, whether built for a tent or personal cooling. The Geek Aire GF2DB was extremely easy to use as there are only two buttons. The power button is on the fan section, while the battery has a small button on the back to let you check that status. One click sets the blades in motion, while additional clicks allow you to cycle through the speeds. There are five speeds on this fan, and as you’d expect, the runtime depends on the speed you choose.

Geek Aire GF2DB Parts

Geek Aire GF2DB Parts

In my tests, this little fan actually performed better than expected. I was able to get around 3.5 hours on high from the fan before it finally came to a stop. While I did not perform the same tests on low, I did get around 6 hours of mixed usage, so it should get close to the advertised 9-hour runtime on the lowest setting. A full recharge took close to 3.5 hours, and there are indicator lights that allow you to check the speed or power level at any time.

While small, this fan has six blades and a lot of power. It outperformed the bigger fans we reviewed from an airflow standpoint when comparing the top speed settings. On high, I could actually feel the air from around 10 feet away, so it’s more than powerful enough to cool down a small to medium-sized tent. There are no attachment points on this model because of the design, however, and you’ll want it on low if you’re trying to sleep.

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The Verdict

Geek Aire specializes in producing portable cooling devices, and while the GF2DB isn’t necessarily built for campers, it’s an ideal choice for backpackers that want something light, powerful, and portable. I was impressed by the airflow, given its size, and loved the fact you can use both the fan head and handle with other devices. The ability to rotate the head would have been helpful, however, as port placement could put you into a pickle if you plan to run the fan from other USB-powered sources.

  • Speeds: 5
  • Power: USB
  • Runtime: 3.5 to 9 hours
  • Weight: 6.3 ounces
  • Dimensions: 4.1” x 9.2” x 1.6”
  • Warranty: 1-year
Opolar F20 Portable Camping Fan

Opolar F20 Portable Camping Fan

Opolar F20 Portable Camping Fan

The second portable personal fan I tested for tent use comes from Opolar with the F20. It’s just a little heavier than Geek Aire’s fan at 7.8 ounces but has an entirely different form factor that’s more in-line with a traditional fan.

This little fan is another example of a gadget where looks can be deceiving. After unboxing the F20, I honestly didn’t expect much, especially after testing the powerful GF2DB. I found Opolar’s fan to be just as effective even though there are only three speeds instead of five. I thought it was noticeably quieter as well.

Buttons for power and off are the only controls on this fan, although there are a few semi-hidden functions. An extra press of the button after the 3rd setting activates a small white LED light located on the side of the fan. When the fan is running, you can hold down on the power button for around 5 seconds to activate another light inside the fan, as shown in the photo below.

Opolar F20 Portable Camping Fan LED Light

Opolar F20 Portable Camping Fan LED Light

Like most fans in this range, you can power the OPOLAR F20 through a rechargeable battery or special wall adapter. The battery is rated at 3350mAh but is removable, which extends the lifespan of the fan. It can be charged from any USB port with the included cable, and it took around 4 hours to bring it back to life in my tests.

As for the battery life, at full speed, I was able to get 3.5 hours from the F20. That’s on par with our other mini fan, but this one held up for longer at low and medium speeds. While it only has four blades, they are wider and were able to push air further as well. I could still feel it on high from around 13 feet away, which was impressive.

Another area where the OPOLAR F20 bests the Geek Aire is portability. Both are small, light, and easy to store in a pack, but this one is only 1-5/8” thick and 5.9” high. It’s a little wider than my Galaxy S10+ and certainly thicker, but shorter. There are no attachment points on this one, so you can’t hang it overhead, although the design allows it to stay upright with relative ease.

The Verdict

The F20 is another tent fan that won’t break the bank but pushes a considerable amount of air for its size. I thought this one was easier to pack than the other mini tent fans I tested from Geek Aire, although the Opolar F20 doesn’t double as a power bank. The ability to swap out rechargeable batteries makes up for that, and the dual lighting feature was a nice touch as well.

  • Speeds: 3
  • Power: USB
  • Runtime: 3.5 to 12 hours
  • Weight: 7.8 ounces
  • Dimensions: 5.9” x 4.9” x 1-5/8”
  • Warranty: 1-year

 

TREVA 10” All-Purpose Fan

TREVA 10” All-Purpose Fan

TREVA 10” All-Purpose Fan

Tents come in many shapes and sizes, from inflatable tents and pop-ups to large multi-room tents that can hold an entire family. O2COOL’s TREVA fan isn’t something you’ll want to break out in a backpacking tent, but this large fan can cool areas quickly and quietly.

Billed as an all-purpose fan, the TREVA FD10101A is an interesting option to take on the road. It’s a large system, but still fairly thin at under 4” and weighs a little under 2 pounds. It doesn’t have a traditional handle, although there is a ridge along the top that allows you to tote it around. Despite its size, it packs reasonably well, measuring 11.5” x 11.5” and is around 3” at its thickest point when the stand is folded.

This fan won’t win any design contests, although it has a nice rugged utilitarian look. It’s gray with a plastic housing and has five plastic blades. The grill is plastic as well, but feels sturdy and shouldn’t give you any problems. A switch on the bottom allows you to turn it on, and there are two speeds to choose from with low and high.

TREVA 10” All-Purpose Fan Housing

TREVA 10” All-Purpose Fan Housing

Both speeds pushed plenty of air but didn’t provide the distance I expected. On high, this one topped out at around 8’ and just felt a bit underpowered. In a tent, it’ll do the trick, although it’s not the type of system to blow your hair back. You can stand the fan completely upright thanks to a tilting base, and there are several levels of articulation as well if you want to angle the airflow.

The O2COOL TREVA is a dual power fan, so you can choose from battery power or use the included 5’ wall charger depending on your needs. For battery power, you’ll need to unlock the top of the base and slide in six batteries. You’ll need D batteries for this one, which will add to the weight, but the trade-off is worth it if you value cordless convenience. I was able to get over 30 hours from this fan with mixed usage, although there’s no way to check battery levels.

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The Verdict

The TREVA Personal Fan is a solid option if you’re looking for a fan you can use at a campsite or around the house. It’s large and will be a little cumbersome in some situations, but it has an excellent price point and allows you to use batteries or an adapter. As mentioned, I did expect more power from this one, which was a little surprising, especially at close range. It’s well worth a look if you need something large and cheap to push air around but invest in rechargeable batteries if you plan to use it cordless.

  • Speeds: 2
  • Power: Adapter or Batteries
  • Runtime: Variable
  • Weight: 1.14 pounds
  • Dimensions: 11.5” x 11.5” x 3”
  • Warranty: None
Treva 10” Portable Desktop Fan

Treva 10” Portable Desktop Fan

Treva 10” Portable Desktop Fan

The second fan I tested from O2COOL is also from their TREVA series. While the two units have plenty in common, this one has an entirely different design, which could make it easier to tote whether you’re camping out of an RV or using a tent.

This portable desktop fan from O2COOL is another large plastic fan, although it doesn’t feel quite as cheap as the other model. It feels a bit more robust, and the overall design doesn’t leave many points of failure. That said, there is no stand, as this fan will need to sit flat on a stable surface, and it’s slightly larger than FD10101A as well.

At 13” x 12” x 3”, you will need to free up room to store this fan, and it tips the scales at 2.4 pounds. There’s a lip around the top, just like on the other model, which allows you to carry this fan around. This version is more streamlined, despite the fact it’s a few inches bigger. I didn’t have any problem keeping the fan steady on a table or countertop, but you may have difficulties in a tent.

Treva 10” Portable Desktop Fan Housing

Treva 10” Portable Desktop Fan Housing

With no stand, there is no way to adjust this fan, so placement is critical with the TREVA B00ATSHMIQ. There are no attachment points, so it’s definitely in the desktop or RV class compared to other models I tested. It has two speeds, and puts out an ample amount of air thanks to five fan blades and its 10” design, although I did experience some vibrations and rattling on high.

This fan is powered through an AC adapter or six D batteries. The battery compartment has been redesigned as well. It’s on the back of the fan, not in the stand, and is accessed by loosening two Philips head screws. Unfortunately, the panel was extremely difficult to remove on this test model, and there was a bit of rust on the terminals inside as well. Battery life is on par with the company’s other 10” fan or unlimited with the included adapter.

The Verdict

The TREVA FD10101A from O2COOL is a great fit for campers that need a fan to cool off in an RV or at a campsite, but it’s not the best fit for tents. While it did push air slightly further than their other model, the lack of a stand will make it difficult in a tent, on the ground, unless it’s incredibly flat. When you combine that with the overall size and noise level, it’s not a fan we would recommend for the campsite.

  • Speeds: 2
  • Power: Adapter or Batteries
  • Runtime: Variable
  • Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Dimensions: 13” x 12” x 3”
  • Warranty: None

Final Thoughts

If you’re looking for a small fan to put in your tent that can keep a few people cool, the Opolar F20 is an excellent choice. While I liked the modular nature and power bank on Geek Aire’s model, the F20 was quieter overall and had better battery life on the low end. The ability to purchase an extra rechargeable battery and the dual lights put it over the top in my eyes as well.

With our larger test subjects, there were more similarities than differences, although the winner was clear in the TREVA FD10101A All-Purpose fan. It may not be as slick as the company’s other model, but it’s well-suited for tents thanks to the adjustable stand. You will get more bang for your buck as well, just pick up a pack of rechargeable D batteries if you plan to go battery powered.

How to find the Best Camping Tent Fan

While we only reviewed a handful of fans for this roundup, there are dozens of portable fans that will work on the trail or around a campsite. When looking for the best camping tent fan, here are areas you’ll want to consider.

Coverage

Every fan we tested has multiple speed settings, and that’s true for most fans sold today. Well, there’s still a sweet spot when it comes to coverage, and it’s one of the most important decisions you’ll need to make when choosing a camping fan.

A larger fan will usually provide more coverage as they will have larger blades, which make them ideal for wider tents that sleep, several people. Smaller fans can cover more distance, and blow harder than a large fan, but the air will be more focused.

This is also an area where you will want to pay attention to the power and speed of the fan. Bigger isn’t necessarily better, and you may not notice much difference between low and high on some models. A small tent fan may have plenty of speeds, but they won’t do much good if you need to keep 3 – 4 people cool throughout the night.

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Portability

Are you packing for a weekend trip in the woods or going lightweight for a quick trip up a trail? In addition to the size of your tent, you need to think about how packable and portable a tent fan is. If you’re heading to a campground, size may not matter, but you do not want to lug a large fan on a hike – especially if space is tight.

Obviously, small tent fans like the OPOLAR F20 won’t take up much space in a pack. They are ideal for personal use, but some have enough oomph to keep two people cool on a humid summer night. Fans from 6 to 10” can be manageable as well, depending on the design. Anything over 10” is going to be ungainly for most people and better reserved for trips where you drive to the camping spot – not walk or hike.

Placement

Almost any portable fan can serve as a tent fan, depending on your needs. Some are better suited to the task from a design standpoint, however. Before you let a machine with a half-dozen speeds or a slick design bowl you over, think about where you plan to place the fan in your tent.

With medium to large tent fans, you’re not going to find many systems that can be hung from inside your tent. Weight can be a concern, and you definitely don’t want a hard plastic object weighing a couple of pounds smashing into your face while you sleep. That will quickly ruin your camping trip.

More often than not, you’ll want to sit larger fans on the ground, so look for a system with a flat, stable bottom. If you’re going to hang your fan from the ceiling or mount it somewhere in your tent, pick up a lightweight fan and check for attachment points.

Power

This comes down to power cords and batteries, although some of the best camping tent fans are dual-powered so that you don’t need to choose. A power cord isn’t ideal when you’re camping unless you’re using a vehicle and adapter for a power source. Solar fans are also an option, but battery-powered fans are the most popular choice for many campers today.

With a battery-powered tent fan, there are two types of systems to keep in mind. There are fans that use removable batteries, and ones with fixed rechargeable batteries.  Any fan that lets you change the batteries or use rechargeable ones has an advantage over a fan where the battery is attached. Once the power pack goes bad on those models, you will probably need to purchase a new fan.

You can also recharge many cordless camping fans through a number of USB enabled devices,portable LED lanterns including smartphones and power banks. You obviously need to have another device with you in the wild to recharge these types of fans, but it beats bringing along an extra set of batteries. It all depends on your needs.

The biggest thing to remember with any battery-powered fan is runtime. The higher the speed and larger the fan, the more juice it consumes. Recharging times are essential as well unless you want to spend half the evening in a humid tent. Having a set of backup batteries or a way to revive a fixed battery is vital when you are camping.

Noise level

Do you enjoy the sound of Mother Nature at night, or do you cringe every time a branch breaks? Noise level is something a lot of campers don’t consider with a camping tent fan and something that can make you regret your purchase rather quickly.

None of the fans we tested are what I would consider loud, but a few are noticeable at high speed. They would definitely drown out some of the world outside your tent, which may be exactly what you need to get a good night’s sleep outdoors. While you won’t find many companies that list a decibel rating, it’s a good idea to check consumer reviews for noise levels beforehand.

Durability

Durability is another overlooked area when people shop for tent fans, and one that could leave you in a lurch the first night out. Big or small, a tent fan should be rugged enough to last through several excursions outdoors, but two of the most significant issues are stands and battery compartments.

If you’re ever lost the back to a battery compartment on your remote control or any other gadget, you know what a hassle that can be. Well, it’s worse on the trail unless you happen to have a roll of tape handy. One of the first things I checked on my review units was the area around the battery compartment. Tent fans with battery lids that are held into place through a fixed latch or screws are ideal.

The housing and stand are two other areas that can be a cause for concern. There’s not a lot you can do about the housing, unfortunately, besides look for a model that seems durable and has a warranty. Those are both hit or miss from my experience; review models aside.

Bringing It All Together

Whether you choose one of the tent fans we reviewed, or prefer to shop around, be sure to keep your needs in mind along with the people that will accompany you on your trip. In our opinion, coverage and power are two of the biggest things that should factor into your buying decision.

An under powered tent fan won’t do much good in the middle of summer, but neither small diameter fan if it needs to cool 3 people. Placement and portability are not far behind, although there are ways to get around those issues with a little ingenuity.  Given there’s not a wealth of options in the camping fan niche; it’s also a good idea to cast a wide net and think outside of the box.