Canon PowerShot S100

Digitalnerds blog is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. we never accept free products from manufacturers.Learn more.

Earlier this year, Canon launched the successor of the popular PowerShot S95 model, fixing some of the flaws that the customers complained about, like the poor design flash design, narrow maximum aperture at the telephoto end of the zoom range, lack of a grip, slow performance and short battery life. The new S100 has a 10-megapixel CCD sensor and it fixes these issues and also comes with a wider-angle 24mm start to the zoom range, built-in GPS, along with manual controls and zooming during video recording. It measures 3.9 x 2.3 x 1.2 inches and weighs 6.8 ounces.

Aside from these changes, the new PowerShot S100 continues to offer the same photo quality, tonal range and color accuracy that made the S95 a hit. It is capable of delivering great JPEG quality up to ISO 200, and the photos will remain quite good at up to ISO 800.

Canon PowerShot S100 (Source: a.img-dpreview.com)

Canon PowerShot S100 (Source: a.img-dpreview.com)

It is also quite capable of video recording, plus you have the possibility to use the zoom while recording, which is an unobtrusively and quiet action. The videos appear to be quite sharp but they do seem a little bit oversaturated. You can also use a slow-motion recording mode which allows you to capture normally and then play it at 120 or 240 fps, saving the video as an MP4 file.

The main drawback would have to be that Canon did not improve the performance of the new model, which means that the S100 is still somewhat slow in comparison with top players in this class like the LX5 and the XZ-1. Powering on, focusing and shooting will take 1.6 seconds, which is quite reasonable, but it is quite slow when taking two sequential shots: 2.4 seconds for JPEG, 2.6 sec for raw and a disappointing 2.8 seconds for flash. Another drawback would have to be the battery life which is the shortest in this class, but on the flip side, a smaller battery means a smaller camera.

Canon PowerShot S100 (Source: www1.pcmag.com)

Canon PowerShot S100 (Source: www1.pcmag.com)

As for the LCD, it is the same one used for the S95, which means that it is saturated and bright, and you shouldn’t encounter any problems using it in direct sunlight. The design has improved in comparison to its predecessor as the new model features a small grip in front along with a rubberized thumb rest at the rear which allows for a more comfortable and secure grip.

It has the same control ring around its lens that makes the camera stand out from the rest of the crowd, with the exception of the aforementioned XZ-1. You can set the ring to control ISO sensitivity, shutter speed, manual focus, exposure compensation, stepped zoom, white balance, aspect ratio, i-Contrast and other functions as well.